Entries tagged with “Food Events”.


The Seattle Food & Wine Experience is coming up Feb. 28 at Seattle Center, and the organizers are giving away a pair of tickets to our readers.

What can you expect? 

For the wine part of the experience, the posted list of participants includes DeLille Cellars, Erath, McCrea, and 100+ more, with breweries to boot. Around 20 eateries are signed up, from Maximus/Minimus (out of hibernation for the day) and Frost Doughnuts to Artisanal and Campagne and — yes, seriously, check out what these folks have been doing – the Tulalip Casino’s restaurant, Tulalip Bay. Kathy Casey will give a signed cookbook to the first 300 guests.

Tickets are $49 apiece (with a portion going to the non-profit Beecher’s Flagship Foundation), which gets you unlimited samples of food and non-alcoholic beverages, and 50 tasting tickets for alcoholic drinks (at 1-3 tickets per taste). Interested in a chance to get in for free? Just leave a comment here telling me what you like (or, if you prefer, what you don’t like) to see at food festivals. We’ll pick the winner using a random number generator at 9 p.m. PST on Feb. 2.

Updated 2/2 to announce that our random number generator has picked comment #19, Dave, as our winner! Congratulations! 

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pennyworkshop21My husband and I took a food photography workshop with Penny De Los Santos earlier this month (you’ve seen her work in Saveur and National Geographic and various cookbooks), organized by the amazing Seattle Bon Vivant. It’s been interesting exploring photography: When I started out as a journalist, the antiquated expectation was that the writer would stay out of the photo planning, leaving that entirely to the professionals. Later, some of my favorite photographers to work with were those who enjoyed collaborating, helping me understand how they translated or supplemented a story with images. But now, writers really do need to understand enough about the mechanics of photography to take at least passable pictures on our own, even if we’ll never rate as pros.

My big step into improving my (zero) baseline was taking a 10-week Introduction to Digital Photography class at the professional Photographic Center Northwest, where we learned to take our cameras off manual, to learn about shutter speeds and depth of field and other fundamentals. (This was my final project.) Food photography is such a specialized field on its own, though, and Penny’s class got me thinking about food pictures again, eyeing what other people do and trying to figure out how they got the effect they did, trying to break down their photos the same way I analyze the words of writers I admire. 

I also remembered that we don’t even necessarily need a class to improve. Just the practice of photographing the same object and comparing and critiquing our results, as we students did with Penny at Spring Hill, was enormously instructive. We could do the same with a group of friends at any meal.

Here’s a more detailed writeup I did on the class over at Al Dente Blog, and here is a link to a Flickr page of photos from participants (we still need to get ours up there) and links to blog entries by others who wrote about the experience. I especially enjoyed this post by photographer Paula Thomas, who compared Penny’s approach to another food photography workshop she took this year. Funny how interesting it is to see how others describe the same event in words as well as pictures.

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My sister’s birthday is today, and I’m trying to convince her a trip from Delaware to Seattle would make a great gift for herself. She got more of our mom’s cooking genes than I did — she’s the one who worked the counter at Cocolat and forever ruined my grading curve for chocolate cake — and the rare times we see each other, we create good memories around food. One year we ate a perfect dinner at Restaurant Zoe. One visit she made spaghetti sauce in our kitchen, even though she was the guest, just because that’s her way. And one of the most delightful days in Seattle I can remember was a clam chowder festival we attended, maybe 15 years ago. I love food contests. Dishes that all riff on the same theme are more interesting, somehow, than a collection of random bites.

You can see for yourself this Saturday, when the 13th annual Seattle Waterfront Chowder Cookoff takes place from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., as part of the Seattle Maritime Festival. I don’t think it can be connected to the one I attended, which was in Gasworks, but the setup is the same. (more…)

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I’m used to thinking of the fall as time for the Puget Sound Mycological Society’s big mushroom bash, but now there’s a spring event just in time for the first morels, a “Mushroom ‘May’nia fest from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on May 3 at the Burke Museum. Organizers promise recipes, cultivation and cooking tips, family-friendly crafts, and answers to pressing foraging questions such as “How do I know if a mushroom is poisonous or not,”  and “Do I need a permit to harvest mushrooms in Washington state”?  More information here – and, while you’re at the Burke, you can visit the “World In Your Cup” coffee exhibit too.

 

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marmalade

Financially, food has always been my great luxury. My kitchen table came free from a friend and my 15-year-old couch was a gift from my grandmother; I get my clothes at consignment shops and most of my books at libraries… and yet I also jumped last week at the chance to order two jars of wonderful $14 marmalade

I’ve also always known I need to spend less on food, and I certainly know ways to eat frugally and still eat well. So I was glad at the invitation to join United Way of King County’s  ”Hunger Challenge,” asking participants to eat for five days on $7 per day, the maximum food stamp benefit for an individual. The challenge starts April 20, and individuals are encouraged to sign up here and share your experiences on the United Way blog. Several other bloggers will be joining in and sharing stories, including Cook and Eat, Family Friendly Food, Foodista, and GastroGnome.

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I’m down in California for a few days, but checking in often enough to notice that the weekend of May 16-17 is filling up awfully fast. Ruth Reichl is speaking about her latest book, the International Food Bloggers Conference is taking place (with a Reichl event as part of its festivities), and it’s also the fifth annual Seattle Cheese Festival at Pike Place Market.

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Fans of the lovely and departed Veil, here’s a chance to bring a piece of the restaurant home. Co-owner Erik Lindstrom is holding a sale at the closed restaurant (555 Aloha) from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, April 11, noting that the space will soon be changing hands and that he needs to clear out his china, glassware, and silverware. He wrote: “Among the lot, I have china from top of line Rosenthal to Crate and Barrel. A variety of glassware will be on hand, including Riedel Stemware, Inncrystal water glasses, and a variety of martini & cognac glasses.”

Note that it’s cash only.

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Speaking of bacon, Tom Douglas is hosting a “Baconopolis” event on April 24 at the Palace Ballroom, featuring “bacon tastings from artisan producers and creative bacon bites from Tom Douglas Restaurants.” The menu so far includes bacon hash, Bloody Marys with bacon garnish, BLTs, “butterscotch bacon bites,” and, just to get fancy, a “lardon salad” with poached quail egg. Producers include Palace Kitchen alum Duskie Estes, Nueske’s (highly recommended for bacon donuts), Pike Place Market’s Bavarian Meats, and local bacon-ators TBA. The porky shindig begins at 6 p.m.. Cost: $20, which also includes one drink ticket for wine or beer. Tax and tip not included. For reservations call Christy at 206-448-2001 or write christinal@tomdouglas.com.

You realize what must be next, don’t you? Baconopoly.

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Diane LaVonne, who runs a cooking school near Pike Place Market is hosting a meal and conversation on “sushi and sustainability” April 20. The event will involve 2+ hours in the kitchen with Kin Lui and Casson Trenor of Tataki in San Francisco, billed as the country’s first sustainable sushi restaurant. (Trenor is also the author of Sustainable Sushi, and runs a site with a handy up-to-date guide on the same.)

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Ethan Stowell's cobia crudo with fennel, chilies, and taggiasca olives

Ethan Stowell's StarChefs crudo (recipe below)/Photos by David Dickey

Seattle’s “Rising Star” chefs got a chance this week to collectively show off the dishes that won them the honor from StarChefs, the online magazine that’s been called the industry’s Gourmet. Here’s the tough part, though:

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