Entries tagged with “Barbecue”.


Barbecue” is a fighting word in this city; there’s no way to express a preference for one place over another without hearing how (a) Seattle has no good barbecue, and (b) your favorite isn’t actually the best. I’m glad I don’t man Sunset magazine’s inbox after seeing the latest issue choose “10 best barbecue joints in the West”. Surprise! While the top honors went to BarBersQ in Napa, Seattle won two spots on the list . Washington was the only state besides California to score more than one spot.

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Julie Reinhardt’s bio says she’s “ready to talk pork butt with the most macho grillmaster.”

Really, though, she’s here to talk with the least macho audience, the women who have historically been the weaker half of the backyard family barbecue and grill. Here Reinhardt is with She-Smoke: A Backyard Barbecue Book
a thoroughly practical, well-researched new guide that manages to be fun but not patronizing.

It is, as advertised, a casually-styled, from-the-ground-up primer for those who don’t know their low from their slow. It explains how to turn on a gas grill (the book covers grilling as well as barbecuing), reviews the different regional styles of barbecue, and diagrams how to break down a chicken (the latter Reinhardt admits only learning at age 30, “out of sheer embarassment that I couldn’t do it.”) But Reinhardt’s expertise and enthusiasm comes through clearly enough to also satisfy ‘cuers who lick their chops at chapter headings like “Texas Beef Brisket: An In-Depth Study,” and would consider digging a pit for the salmon bake recipe she includes in honor of family summers on the Washington coast.

We talked with Reinhardt, co-owner of Smokin’ Pete’s BBQ in Ballard, just named one of the best barbecue spots in the West, for your Memorial Day mealtime pleasure. And if you’re planning your own barbecue this weekend, consider entering her contest (video above) to win prizes and fight hunger by creating “the largest virtual BBQ in the world.”

“I love the idea that barbecue brings people together,” said Reinhardt, a Seattle native with Alabama roots. We tend to think of “barbecue” as a noun, as a piece of smoked pork, say, but she loves the broader term that includes the event as well as the food. For her, it’s about the “down-home togetherness” of the cuisine and its history and roots.

Here are a few highlights from our talk and from the book.
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